Institute for Telecommunication Sciences
the research laboratory of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Roger A. Dalke; George A. Hufford; Ronald L. Ketchum

Abstract: The Institute for Telecommunication Sciences has developed a computer simulation model that can be used to predict coverage and quality of service for proposed terrestrial communication systems that broadcast digital television such as local multipoint distribution services and multichannel multipoint distribution services. The model includes a variety of digital modulation schemes that have been proposed for these services. The model also contains a nonlinear amplifier that allows the user to evaluate the effects of intermodulation distortion on performance. In addition to a simple additive white Gaussian noise channel, three different propagation channels are included: a simple two-ray channel; and two more complex channels based on measurements of broadband signals in various geographic environments. A description of the simulation model as well as examples of applications are given in this report.

Keywords: simulation; local multipoint distribution services (LMDS); multichannel multipoint distribution services (MMDS); digital broadcast services; propagation channel model; nonlinear amplifier; traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA); digital communication systems


To request a reprint of this report, contact:

Lilli Segre, Publications Officer
Institute for Telecommunication Sciences
(303) 497-3572
lsegre@ntia.doc.gov

For technical information concerning this report, contact:

Roger A. Dalke
Institute for Telecommunication Sciences
(303) 497-3109
rdalke@ntia.doc.gov


Disclaimer: Certain commercial equipment, components, and software may be identified in this report to specify adequately the technical aspects of the reported results. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, nor does it imply that the equipment or software identified is necessarily the best available for the particular application or uses.

Back to Search Results